Tag Archives: EDC

2013 Year in WTF Music Review

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One of my favorite times of the year is December. Some might think that’s because of Christmas… but nay, my favorite holiday is my birthday because we all have some degree of narcissism. Some might think that’s because of the snow… but no, you try walking up UW-Madison’s Bascom Hill in over a foot of snow. Some even might think that it’s because of the holiday season in general… but no, I live in Chicago, IL and I hate tourists so add that with Michigan Avenue and you’ll find I pretty much stay in my house during the holiday season. The reason December is one of my favorite times of the year is because of all the “2013 Year in Review” posts that come out. Whenever I read one of these posts, my thoughts are either 1) “oh right that happened, I tried to forget,” 2) “No way! That totally happened in 1999, not 2013,” or 3) “LOL I should have read the news more often, when did this happen.”

Obviously, this is a music review website, so I should probably focus on 2013 Year in Review: Music, but I really do urge you to take a look at the more general news story versions of 2013 Year in Review posts because I guarantee you missed the dumbest things that happened this year. Here’s my review of 2013 Music though… enjoy…

1. Big artists released new albums.

Katy Perry’s Prism (October 22): First time to my site? I’m obsessed with Katy Perry. Although not the best album of the year (we’ll get to my opinions on the best later), it is hands down an awesome album. Prism doesn’t stray too far from the sounds of Teenage Dream, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing for someone like Katy Perry. With hits like “Roar,” “Walking on Air,” “Dark Horse,” and “Unconditionally” already being constantly replayed on the radio after just one month, Katy Perry clearly doesn’t need to change her sound. Plus, she’s Katy Perry – just try not to love her.

Justin Timberlake’s The 20/20 Experience (March 19): JT came back. Technically, JT came back twice since The 20/20 Experience was released in two parts. The first part debuted at number one on the Billboard 200, selling 968,000 copies in its first week. People were excited for JT to say the least.

Kanye West’s Yeezus (June 18): Guess what? I’ve never listened to this album. But hey, it came out and it was huge. I haven’t really given Kanye West the time of day since he named his child Blue Ivy. The album deserves some recognition though because Yeezus debuted at number one on the Billboard 200, selling 327,000 copies in its first week. Plus, we’ve all seen that music video for “Bound 2” right?

OneRepublic’s Native (March 26): This album was actually meant for 2012 (circa August 27th, 2012 with “Feel Again”), but wasn’t ready in time, and was thus released in 2013. I have no problem with an artist publically announcing that their album is not ready in time – beautiful things take time, right? And oh my god, Native is beautiful. Native peaked at number four on the Billboard 200, but a solid number one in my heart (still not the best album in my mind, have patience).

Honorable mentions: 1) Beyonce, 4 (March 29); 2) Drake, Nothing Was the Same (September 24); 3) Jay Z, Magna Carta Holy Grail (July 9).

2. There were a lot of really, really bad reunions.

This year was like the reunion of the 90s. First there was Destiny’s Child at the 2013 SuperBowl Half-Time Show. It literally lasted like 20 seconds and I’m pretty sure they didn’t even turn on Kelly or Michelle’s microphones. Great attempt #1 though, Music Industry. The second reunion was NSYNC at the 2013 VMAs. It lasted a little longer, and at one point Justin Timberlake was actually in the background. In addition, the whole time, you’re like “oh their microphones aren’t on either” and then all of the sudden, JC decides to sing the most unnecessary “baby, baby, baby” just to prove he thinks he’s still memorable. The final reunion of 2013 was TLC at the American Music Awards. They sang “Waterfalls.” Like no, “Scrubs” or go home.

3. EDM made some great moves.

Daft Punk. Random Access Memories had to have been one of the most anticipated albums of 2013, or maybe I was just so anxious for it that I felt the rest of the world was too. We hadn’t heard new Daft Punk since Human After All dropped in 2005, so Random Access Memories was eight years overdue. The album is the duo’s most successful album overall, as it debuted at number one in over 20 countries worldwide and eventually reached number one on 23 different charts.

Avicii. True was Avicii’s debut studio album and it is amazing. The album first came to listeners’ ears in April 2013 when Avicii released a 60-minute mix on SoundCloud, and then it continued to reach ears when Avicii played over 40 total minutes of the album at Ultra Music Festival in his set. The three singles released from the album – “Wake Me Up,” “You Make Me,” and “Hey Brother” – have been quite successful, too. Although the album only peaked at number four on the Billboard 200, it’s no doubt that this was an exciting year for Avicii.

EDC. Electronic Daisy Carnival made a lot of moves this year. I don’t think we need to discuss that it happened, that it increased in size, that it spread to new locations, or that it was probably amazing (I obviously didn’t make it this year… or any year so far, but it is on my bucket list). What EDC really taught us this year was the true positive economic impact that festivals have despite what non-festival goers think and protest. If you still don’t believe that festivals are GREAT and POSITIVE, check out Insomniac Event’s Economic Analysis of EDC Chicago 2013.

Swedish House Mafia. Although the soundtrack for the One Last Tour came out in 2012, the tour started and ended in 2013. I had tickets, but school comes first (my mother told me that… trust me, I would have been there) so I didn’t make it. Over 1 million fans saw the end of the Swedish House Mafia era on their last tour – that doesn’t include the people, like myself, who tuned in to see their final performance together at Ultra Music Festival.  “We came, we raved, and we fucking love you.”

4. Miley Cyrus made her mark. It happened, it was necessary to include it in the review, but we don’t need to speak about it more.

5. Nielsen/Billboard released the mid-year Music Industry Report. The trends: vinyl sales up, streams up, digital track sales down. So what we really see here is an increase in hipsters listening to vinyls (just kidding, I have my own collection that I love), a lot of people listening to music on Spotify, and a lot less people purchasing music with a lot more people illegally downloading music. But really, the report is really interesting and I’m very interested to see the end-of-year report, too.

6. A lot of really great albums came out from new artists.

CHVRCHES, The Bones of What You Believe (September 24). While CHVRCHES didn’t first come to the scene in 2013, they’re pretty new and The Bones of What You Believe was their first studio album that dropped this year. The album got some great recognition too: it was number 32 on Rolling Stone’s 50 Best Albums of 2013 and received a score of 81/100 on Metacritic, indicating “universal acclaim.” In addition, it reached number one on the US Independent Albums chart.

Lorde, Pure Heroine (September 27). Lorde has to be one of the biggest new names in 2013. …Like “Royals” – I’ve heard that song every day for the past six months at least. She even just had her cover of the Tears for Fears song “Everybody Wants to Rule the World” included on the Catching Fire soundtrack. Her album, Pure Heroine, peaked at number three on the Billboard 200. Lorde is seriously talented and her voice is seriously unique. The girl is 16 – ponder that for a bit.

HAIM, Days Are Gone (September 30). HAIM (anyone Jewish, please help) has actually been around for a while, but their first album, Days Are Gone, was just released in 2013, a few months ago. The album has some great new sounds (similar to Fleetwood Mac, I hear), but my favorite is definitely “Send Me Down.”

7. My personal opinion… The Number 1 Album of 2013: The Great Gatsby Soundtrack.

Do soundtracks count as albums when it comes to figuring out the best one of the year? They do in my mind. The Gatsby soundtrack was huge. If you didn’t like the Gatsby soundtrack, it’s safe to say you actually do not have a soul. Regardless of your feelings toward the movie (if you didn’t like it, you didn’t read the book, plain and simple), you have to love the soundtrack. There were huge names associated with this album: Jay Z, Beyoncé, Will.I.Am, Fergie, and Florence + the Machine. There were new artists on this album: Lana Del Rey, The xx, Gotye, Nero, and Sia (ok those aren’t new, but less known at the time). When the track list and first trailer for the movie including some of the songs came out, the album started becoming highly anticipated. The album blew away predicted sales and chart performance. Within its first week of release, it had sold over 137,000 copies and was at number two on the Billboard 200. The Gatsby soundtrack deserved all the recognition it got and more – my Twitter feed and my Facebook news feed were filled with Gatsby Soundtrack links for weeks after the release – it was everywhere and it deserved to be. Sure, it didn’t strike a number one, but sometimes we need to look at the content of the album rather than the sales and chart positions of the album.

8. Finally, the end of year mashups that were released YESTERDAY:

What’s the Deal with EDM?

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Every single time I listen to EDM music, from house to trance, my dad declares, “That’s not music.” And every single time he says that, I wonder how people can consider EDM to not be real music. Trust me, I’ve tried to play DJ with those free downloads you can get on the Internet and by watching YouTube videos of people who think they can DJ, and it’s hard. Maybe it was because I was using free downloads and amateur YouTube videos, but it was hard, and it goes to show that not everyone can do it. EDM is not new, but its recent impact and following is huge.

Here’s a few things that I could see may affect people’s misunderstanding of EDM:

1. The teenagers who don’t know what EDM is and just see it as a reason to try illicit drugs and jump up and down. On October 12, 2013, I went to see Kaskade for the second time, the first being at Lollapalooza in 2012. I love seeing Kaskade live – the energy he gives off while performing just shows that he really wants to be there, that if he could, he would perform forever. However, I went into the concert knowing that I wanted to see him, but that it was all ages and I would have to deal with a lot of people who weren’t really there to see that energy in play. When the show started, my sister and I, 20 years old and 23 years old respectively, were both sober and found ourselves behind a group of 20 or so preteens. I kid you not these kids had not even hit puberty. At no point during Kaskade’s show were these kids paying attention to Kaskade. I witnessed them as they passed around a full bottle of Bacardi that had clearly been stolen from the venue bar, whip out a bag of Molly and wave it around to show everyone they were “cool enough” to take it, and make out with every person of the opposite sex in their group. They had NO IDEA who Kaskade even was; I know this because when the opening act started to perform, they all argued whether or not he was “Cascada” and had to whip out their smartphones to find a picture of Kaskade’s face. I get it – you’re fourteen years old and this music and atmosphere is the new trend, but maybe that’s why older generations can’t understand what EDM means to us. There’s so many people that are just jumping on the bandwagon and not understanding the true meaning of EDM. EDM is not just some fad that’s going in and out; EDM is to my generation what MTV was to my parent’s generation – it’s our passion.

2. There’s a lot of popular remixes.  A lot of the reason that I first started listening to EDM was because I liked the remixes of the songs I already listened to. I liked that I was getting a way to listen to the same song, but still have it be different. I liked that it was bringing back older songs in a new way. A lot of people argue that DJs take music that isn’t theirs and just remix it. But how come we accept Flo Rida as an artist, but not DJs? When was the last time Flo Rida released a song that didn’t have some hint of someone else’s material in it? He’s “sampled” Etta James, Infinity Ink, Bingo Players, Dead or Alive, Eiffel 65, and so much more; he doesn’t even give credit where credit is due. When you buy a DJs remix on iTunes (I can only speak for legal practices of purchasing music), the “artist” listed is the artist that originally created the song. The best way to sum up why remixes are OK is with a quote from Kaskade (have we figured out that he’s my favorite EDM artist yet?): “Music is not disposable, people. We can twist it, sample it, mash it and experience it in endless ways. Open up.”

But here’s why I love EDM, why and how EDM is making an impact, and why you should jump on the bandwagon (for the right reasons):

1. Dance music has always been around; we’re just morphing it into our dance music. I remember when I was living in Texas (so keep in mind I’m like 7-10 years old), my mom and I would always listen to the “gay radio station” whenever we were in the car. That’s how I learned who Daft Punk was, who Basement Jaxx was, who Benny Benassi was, and who Who Da Funk was. I’ve been listening to EDM since I was seven years old and I embrace the way it’s changed. All music changes – our minds are only capable of deciphering so many different sounds so why not explore all those sounds?

2. Anyone can become a DJ… just like anyone can become a journalist. In the age of Internet, the line between professional journalism and amateur journalism has been blurred, but we still get to choose which source we like, which source we trust. Why can’t the same be said of music? Anyone can become a rockstar, a singer, a dancer – but we choose to only point out that anyone can be a DJ because it’s “so easy”? I’ve tried. It’s not easy… not that I ever wanted to be a touring DJ artist – I’ll stick to my dream of owning a restaurant. The only reason people are choosing to point out that anyone can be a DJ is because they want to find reasons to shut down the EDM movement. The only reason you hear about more up and coming DJs than other types of musicians is because they are more passionate about their music – because they want their music to be heard by everyone. And so what if it’s easier for a DJ to make it than other types of musicians – we still get to choose who we like, who we trust.

3. EDM is making a huge economic impact. As Pasquale Rotella, Insomniac CEO responsible for Electric Daisy Carnival, stated this past month, EDC Chicago brought in an estimated $26.1 million in to the Chicago area economy. I don’t know about you, but having money brought into our economy right now sounds pretty good. Big cities and states embrace the festivals: Chicago has Perry’s Stage at Lollapalooza, Spring Awakening Music Festival, Wavefront Music Festival, and North Coast Music Festival; Miami has Ultra Music Festival; Michigan has Electric Forest; New York has Electric Zoo; California originally had Electric Daisy Carnival, but it has since expanded nationally; Texas has plenty; Georgia has plenty. These massive festivals bring tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of people together… and in the process, bring money to the local and state governments.

So, yes, EDM has seen a huge increase in popularity within the past couple of years, picking up a huge following. The thing that people who are anti-EDM don’t understand is that EDM is more than the commercialized market they see thrown in their face everyday – in advertisements, in political campaigns, etc. – it’s a movement that a lot of us are proud to be a part of. I love that for the past two hours I’ve been sitting at my desk listening to Kaskade, Calvin Harris, Krewella, Alesso, Nervo, and more without getting bored. I love that on my calendar I have listed four different concerts in Chicago that I know I won’t get to go to (because there’s a little thing called school and “poor college kid”) but that I still pretend I get to be a part of. I think the reason I most love EDM is because the artists love their fans – they’re most dedicated to their fans. Don’t get me wrong … I’ll always love Katy Perry … but I don’t think she’ll ever interact with her fans as much as EDM artists. I don’t see her playing hangman in the middle of the day on Twitter, putting up truth or dare videos on YouTube, or giving away free music just in the hopes that fans will spread the word in exchange.

Don’t judge the movement, join the movement. And if you still can’t agree with that – Nicki Minaj exists, so why can’t EDM?